On Homosexuality

In the beginning, God created male and female

in Their image

In the Gospels, we are told by Jesus

that in heaven we will neither marry nor be given in marriage,

so the matter of who you love is immaterial in the grand scope of eternity.

We see in Sodom quite the antithesis of any loving and platonic,

but rather the byproduct of rape culture

and child molestation prevalent in those times, as it is in ours.

In fact, this practice of older men defiling young boys

carries over to Paul’s day,

where Paul again expressly forbids it.

And then their is Levitical law.

These laws were sanitary by nature,

encouraging people to avoid pork and bottom feeders, both of which carry deadly

parasites,

and to keep their homes clean

In this vein, it is understandable to withhold from sexual relations,

as anything to do with sex or sexuality involves the transmission of fluids,

which may or may not carry blood-born pathogens and sexually transmitted diseases,

and the passages give male homosexual relations extra pause

as anal penetration carries with it addition chance of transmission,

but we are now allowed to eat pork

and we are encouraged to delight in our sexuality,

even though Western culture still retains and rather convoluted relationship with it.

As Jesus said in the Scriptures, never will an iota of the Gospel will be thrown out

or discarded,

but our perception of it is allowed to change.

If not for Jesus’ middle road, we would not have the substitutionary atonement

fulfilling and bypassing the former call for endless sacrifice.

In the same way, we see that God is bigger and wiser than any one of us.

Their perspective is eternal.

You of course are called upon to make your own decisions on the matter,

for we must be sure of our convictions lest we fall into sin, as Paul so warns us.

So, examine the Scriptures and make up your own mind.

Be loved. Be blessed. Thank you for your time.

 

 

Fiction and Social Intelligence

I read a fascinating article about the link between fiction and social intelligence. In ancient literature, the narrative primarily focused on the external, on battles and bloodlines. Even emotion was expressed externally- via the ripping of clothes, the tearing out hair, etc. Over time, especially around the time of the Greeks, we begin to see a shift from that external world to the internal one. We begin to focus more on the mind, the heart, even if they had a fundamental distrust of the latter.

We see this shift affect even religion. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, we watch as holiness moves from what you do to what you feel. That is why David, in his psalms, is able to count himself faultless, because in his mind he has kept all the dictates of the law up to that point in his life. Then Christ comes in and presses on beyond the law to the heart. Now, obedience to God is not so much about murder as about hate, not so much about adultery but about lust. From that point on, our spiritual walk begins to capsulate all of us, not just what others see.

But the narrative goes deeper. With Shakespeare, we are given soliloquies and asides, painstakingly pointing out the mental-emotional state of the speaker as the character in question literally BREAKS FROM THE PRESENT ACTION to give his impassioned speech.

Skip ahead many years, as we move from theater to film. Now, the performer does not have to project his feelings out to a distant audience. No, as camera equipment continues to evolve, we are able to get closer and closer to the performer, to see his or her every nuance of facial feature and movement in hyper-clear detail. And, as the medium changes, so does the approach. Method acting was born out of shift, challenging performers to explore every aspect of the character, from backstory to emotional state. Everything is laid out on the table. Classical Shakespeare performers are taught to believe that nothing exists outside of the written scene. Method actors are taught that the prescribed scene is just the tip of the iceberg, as far as the character is concerned. And the audience is not only invited, but many times sucked vacuum-tube style into this every deepening world.

As the narrative becomes more emotionally are, so too does the reader/audience member. Because the reader, as the article most insightfully points out, is a co-creator of the story. I mean, who doesn’t feel a certain ownership of a certain text that they feel deeply connected to? Who doesn’t feel a sense of profound loss or accomplishment when the story is finished? So, as the narrative deepens, so too does the reader.

Now, I believe that it so important to read and be open to every style of literature/media, because all have something to offer, and all have their own inherent strength and weaknesses. The ancients had a wonderful sense of history and accomplishment. The moderns have a profound sense of self-awareness. The ancients lacked the verbiage to explore the totality of human emotion. The moderns can be so myopically focused on the moment, that they lose sense of the bigger picture. So, the challenge is to read, watch, experience everything, as you continue develop your own sense of taste and interest. You will never find the same book or movie twice, because you are always different. So, be different, be open, and have fun.

There is so much wonderful material out there. So, go exploring. You may be happily surprised by what you find, both about yourself and the world at large.